General Briefing

Consider Yourself Briefed

121,134 notes

africa-will-unite:

"I will give you an example of how race affects my life. I live in a place called Alpine, New Jersey. Live in Alpine, New Jersey, right? My house costs millions of dollars. [some whistles and cheers from the audience] Don’t hate the player, hate the game. In my neighborhood, there are four black people. Hundreds of houses, four black people. Who are these black people? Well, there’s me, Mary J. Blige, Jay-Z and Eddie Murphy. Only black people in the whole neighborhood. So let’s break it down, let’s break it down: me, I’m a decent comedian. I’m a’ight. [applause] Mary J. Blige, one of the greatest R&B singers to ever walk the Earth. Jay-Z, one of the greatest rappers to ever live. Eddie Murphy, one of the funniest actors to ever, ever do it. Do you know what the white man who lives next door to me does for a living? He’s a fucking dentist! He ain’t the best dentist in the world…he ain’t going to the dental hall of fame…he don’t get plaques for getting rid of plaque. He’s just a yank-your-tooth-out dentist. See, the black man gotta fly to get to somethin’ the white man can walk to." Chris Rock

africa-will-unite:

"I will give you an example of how race affects my life. I live in a place called Alpine, New Jersey. Live in Alpine, New Jersey, right? My house costs millions of dollars. [some whistles and cheers from the audience] Don’t hate the player, hate the game. In my neighborhood, there are four black people. Hundreds of houses, four black people. Who are these black people? Well, there’s me, Mary J. Blige, Jay-Z and Eddie Murphy. Only black people in the whole neighborhood. So let’s break it down, let’s break it down: me, I’m a decent comedian. I’m a’ight. [applause] Mary J. Blige, one of the greatest R&B singers to ever walk the Earth. Jay-Z, one of the greatest rappers to ever live. Eddie Murphy, one of the funniest actors to ever, ever do it. Do you know what the white man who lives next door to me does for a living? He’s a fucking dentist! He ain’t the best dentist in the world…he ain’t going to the dental hall of fame…he don’t get plaques for getting rid of plaque. He’s just a yank-your-tooth-out dentist. See, the black man gotta fly to get to somethin’ the white man can walk to." Chris Rock

(via howtobeterrell)

99 notes

Everyone's Tweeting Photos of Police Brutality Thanks to a Failed NYPD Hashtag | VICE United States

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Twitter is a cool website where you can type any old thing into a box and send it out into the ether for the entire internet to read. Some people use it to joke around, some people use it to be like, “HEY INJUSTICE IS HAPPENING, WHOA #GETINVOLVED,” and some people use it to roleplayas characters from Sonic the Hedgehog. It’s a lot of fun, especially if you like heated arguments with total strangers. 

Large institutions like corporations and government agencies use Twitter too, usually pretty badly. “Hey, we’re a pizza company, send us pictures of you eating our pizza and hashtag them #pizzapics” is an example of a typical lousy tweet from one of these accounts. Generally institutions try to drum up something vague called “social engagement”—basically they want to get people tweeting good stuff about them so other people see those tweets and, I guess, come to think good thoughts about the institution who started the engagement campaign. The New York Police Department was probably thinking they could do one of those social-engagement thingies when they launched the hashtag #MyNYPD with this tweet:

What the person running the Twitter account probably failed to realize is that most people’s interactions with the cops fall into a few categories:

1. You are talking to them to get help after you or someone you knew was robbed, beaten, murdered, or sexually assaulted.

2. You are getting arrested. 

3. You are getting beaten by the police.

In category 1, you are probably not going to be like, “Oh, let me take a selfie with you fine officers so I can remember this moment,” and the other two categories are not things that the NYPD would like people on social media talking about. Additionally, the people who use Twitter a lot (and who aren’t Sonic the Hedgehog roleplayers) are the type who love fucking with authority figures. In any case, #myNYPD quickly became a trending topic in the United States, largely because people were tweeting and retweeting horrific images of police brutality perpetrated by New York City cops. Here are some of the notable ones, starting with VICE’s own Molly Crabapple tweeting a photo of her arrest at an Occupy Wall Street protest:

Here is a Twitter activist using sarcasm, a popular social-media strategy:

More sarcasm:

Hey, remember Kimani Gray, the 16-year-old who got killed by the police in 2013? Remember when people marched in protest of his death and the cops responded with stuff like this?

Another bad thing that happened one time was when the officers on duty at the 2011 West Indian Day Parade starting grinding on some almost-naked dancers.

This is a hashtag started by the NYPD, remember, and this is one of the hashtag’s most popular photos:

Also remember that the idea behind this social media campaign was not, “Hey, people should tweet photos of the NYPD doing bad stuff to dogs.”

Anyway, Twitter is a great place. Just not for the NYPD.

To see all of the #MyNYPD tweets yourself, click here [TW: GRAPHIC CONTENT]

99 notes

pbstv:

During his time on “ER,” George Clooney challenged TV Guide editors who neglected to run a single African-American star for the magazine’s cover photo.

Find out about Clooney’s campaign and watch Pioneers of Television: Doctors and Nurses TONIGHT at 8/7c.

What is your favorite medical TV series?

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

18,588 notes

Abortion Funds by State

Arizona

California

Colorado

District Of Columbia

Distrito Federal

Florida

Georgia

Iowa

Illinois

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Massachusetts

Maryland

Maine

Michigan

Minnesota

Montana

North Carolina

North Dakota

Nebraska

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

Nevada

New York

Ohio

Oklahoma

Ontario

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Virginia

Vermont

Washington

Wisconsin

West Virginia

Wyoming

(Source: bebinn, via sinidentidades)

2,339 notes

angry-hippo:

Lolita Lebron (1919-2010) was an anti-imperialist, feminist, and socialist who advocated for an independent Puerto Rico. In 1954 she entered the United States House of Representatives with other members of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party and opened fire with semi-automatic handguns after yelling, ”¡Viva Puerto Rico Libre!" Five lawmakers were injured in the attack although Lebron herself only fired shots at the ceiling. From prison she became a symbol of hope and strength for many young revolutionaries, and is often cited as an influence of feminist militants from the 1960s and beyond.

angry-hippo:

Lolita Lebron (1919-2010) was an anti-imperialist, feminist, and socialist who advocated for an independent Puerto Rico. In 1954 she entered the United States House of Representatives with other members of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party and opened fire with semi-automatic handguns after yelling, ¡Viva Puerto Rico Libre!" Five lawmakers were injured in the attack although Lebron herself only fired shots at the ceiling. From prison she became a symbol of hope and strength for many young revolutionaries, and is often cited as an influence of feminist militants from the 1960s and beyond.

(via sinidentidades)

1,452 notes

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 21, 1989: Tiananmen Square Protests Begin
On this day in 1989, students began protesting in Tiananmen Square in Beijing, the symbolic central space of China. Several weeks later, when the government sent in the army to end the demonstrations, the citizens of Beijing poured into the streets in support of the students.The demonstrations ended in a massacre on the night of June 3-4, when the government sent the troops into the city with orders to clear Tiananmen Square. One day later, a single, unarmed young man stood his ground before a column of tanks on the Avenue of Eternal Peace. Captured on film and video by Western journalists, this extraordinary confrontation became an icon of the struggle for freedom around the world.
In 2012, FRONTLINE took a look back at how the iconic image of the “tank man” came to be, more than twenty years after the massacre at Tiananmen Square. Photo: A Chinese man stands alone to block a line of tanks heading east on Beijing’s Changan Blvd. in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. (AP/Jeff Widener)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 21, 1989: Tiananmen Square Protests Begin

On this day in 1989, students began protesting in Tiananmen Square in Beijing, the symbolic central space of China. Several weeks later, when the government sent in the army to end the demonstrations, the citizens of Beijing poured into the streets in support of the students.

The demonstrations ended in a massacre on the night of June 3-4, when the government sent the troops into the city with orders to clear Tiananmen Square. One day later, a single, unarmed young man stood his ground before a column of tanks on the Avenue of Eternal Peace. Captured on film and video by Western journalists, this extraordinary confrontation became an icon of the struggle for freedom around the world.

In 2012, FRONTLINE took a look back at how the iconic image of the “tank man” came to be, more than twenty years after the massacre at Tiananmen Square.

Photo: A Chinese man stands alone to block a line of tanks heading east on Beijing’s Changan Blvd. in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. (AP/Jeff Widener)

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)