General Briefing

Consider Yourself Briefed

1,375 notes

jointheiww:

marxvx:

Alabama Prisoners to Strike on Easter Sunday
Building on the mass hunger strike of prisoners in Pelican Bay State Prison in July of last year, several hundred prisoners across Alabama have declared that, beginning Easter Sunday, they will stop prison-mandated labor in protest of detestable living conditions.
The conditions in Alabama prisons are horrendous, packing twice as many people as the 16,000 that can be housed “humanely”, with everything from black mold, brown water, cancer causing foods, insect infestations, and general disrepair. They are also run by free slave labor, with 10,000 incarcerated people working to maintain the prisons daily, adding up to $600,000 dollars a day, or $219,000,000 a year of slave labor if inmates were paid federal minimum wage, with tens of thousands more receiving pennies a day making products for the state or private corporations.
Unpaid labor includes cooking and cleaning, production of license plates, furniture, chemicals, and linens, and farming. The slavery analogy is more than metaphorical: African-Americans comprise only 26% of Alabama’s population, but make up more than 60% of the prison population due to reactionary legislation and racist targeting of communities of color. Reports of beatings and systemic rape and sexual abuse of women inmates by guards at Tutwiler State Prison have surfaced in the media over the last year.
(In the US, forced labor produces everything from military equipment to lingerie, school supplies, and food.)
On the outside, labor unions and prisoners’ advocacy groups have been instrumental in helping prisoners organize themselves. The Free Alabama Movement is pushing an “Education, Rehabilitation, and Re-entry Preparedness Bill” to the Alabama legislature, while the Industrial Workers of the World labor union has vowed to provide support and assistance to the incarcerated laborers.
Melvin Ray, spokesperson for the Free Alabama Movement (FAM) said:

When we look at our situations inside of the Alabama Department of Corrections, we have no choice but to engage in this nonviolent and peaceful protest for civil and human rights. We sleep with rats and roaches. We work for free and eat slop unfit for human consumption. We serve decades in prison solely to provide free labor and without any real prospect for parole, and without any recourse to the courts for justice or redress of grievances. Our mothers, wives, and daughters must expose their breasts and panties just to visit us. This should not be acceptable to anyone. Prison is supposed to be a place where people go to work out issues and return to society. But when there is no focus on education or rehab but solely on profit margins, human suffering is inevitable. ADOC is about free labor and the new slavery no one wants to talk about. That is no longer going to work for the 30,000 of us who suffer because of it.

The Industrial Workers of the World was involved in a similar campaign in 1987, in which they organized 400 incarcerated laborers in an Ohio state prison, before the government ruled that prisoners are not legally entitled to the right to form a union - a right which all other workers enjoy.

More on the Free Alabama Movement’s strike

jointheiww:

marxvx:

Alabama Prisoners to Strike on Easter Sunday

Building on the mass hunger strike of prisoners in Pelican Bay State Prison in July of last year, several hundred prisoners across Alabama have declared that, beginning Easter Sunday, they will stop prison-mandated labor in protest of detestable living conditions.

The conditions in Alabama prisons are horrendous, packing twice as many people as the 16,000 that can be housed “humanely”, with everything from black mold, brown water, cancer causing foods, insect infestations, and general disrepair. They are also run by free slave labor, with 10,000 incarcerated people working to maintain the prisons daily, adding up to $600,000 dollars a day, or $219,000,000 a year of slave labor if inmates were paid federal minimum wage, with tens of thousands more receiving pennies a day making products for the state or private corporations.

Unpaid labor includes cooking and cleaning, production of license plates, furniture, chemicals, and linens, and farming. The slavery analogy is more than metaphorical: African-Americans comprise only 26% of Alabama’s population, but make up more than 60% of the prison population due to reactionary legislation and racist targeting of communities of color. Reports of beatings and systemic rape and sexual abuse of women inmates by guards at Tutwiler State Prison have surfaced in the media over the last year.

(In the US, forced labor produces everything from military equipment to lingerie, school supplies, and food.)

On the outside, labor unions and prisoners’ advocacy groups have been instrumental in helping prisoners organize themselves. The Free Alabama Movement is pushing an “Education, Rehabilitation, and Re-entry Preparedness Bill” to the Alabama legislature, while the Industrial Workers of the World labor union has vowed to provide support and assistance to the incarcerated laborers.

Melvin Ray, spokesperson for the Free Alabama Movement (FAM) said:

When we look at our situations inside of the Alabama Department of Corrections, we have no choice but to engage in this nonviolent and peaceful protest for civil and human rights. We sleep with rats and roaches. We work for free and eat slop unfit for human consumption. We serve decades in prison solely to provide free labor and without any real prospect for parole, and without any recourse to the courts for justice or redress of grievances. Our mothers, wives, and daughters must expose their breasts and panties just to visit us. This should not be acceptable to anyone. Prison is supposed to be a place where people go to work out issues and return to society. But when there is no focus on education or rehab but solely on profit margins, human suffering is inevitable. ADOC is about free labor and the new slavery no one wants to talk about. That is no longer going to work for the 30,000 of us who suffer because of it.

The Industrial Workers of the World was involved in a similar campaign in 1987, in which they organized 400 incarcerated laborers in an Ohio state prison, before the government ruled that prisoners are not legally entitled to the right to form a union - a right which all other workers enjoy.

More on the Free Alabama Movement’s strike

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

127 notes

CNN Asks if the KKK Can ‘Rebrand,’ Seriously | Mediaite

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

bankuei:

….

I mean…. technically they have sort of “rebranded” before (several times in fact). Because, it used to be that women couldn’t join. After fucking up Emancipation for Black people, KKK numbers dwindled until their resurgence in the 1920s when they were more open to women and included immigrants into their groups they hated (in the early 1900s large waves of immigrants poured into the U.S.). 

Then the KKK “rebranded” into the Conservative movement after the Civil Rights Movement. That’s when whites abandoned public spaces rather than integrate and moved into the suburbs. It became not about “well.. I hate Black people.”… but it morphed into “These are my private spaces and the government shouldn’t be telling me what to do in them.” 

The KKK’s numbers depend on one thing….. how afraid white people are at the time. The more afraid they are, the more of them join the KKK. Simple as that.

As long as Fox News continues to keep people in a constant state of fear, they won’t need to “rebrand”

6,289 notes

African-American children with autism are being diagnosed almost two years later than children of any other ethnic group [in the United States], holding up their treatment, and in turn, their quality of life, according to research.

When white children were misdiagnosed with autism they were usually told they had ADHD, but Mandell discovered that Black autistic children were told they had things like psychoses, mental retardation or selective mutism. This, along with the fear that Black parents have of reporting their child’s behavioral issues due to the fact that their children are removed from the home as a result more often, makes it hard for Black children with autism to get the treatment that they need.

Black Children and Autism: The Difference Is Black and White (via genderblinditem)

my first diagnosis was a psychotic disorder btw

(via soflyniggaswannastalkme)

But lets keep pretending doctors know everything and never fuck up or hold prejudices that make the diagnoses they give wrong.

(via fatbodypolitics)

This happened to my brother and noooow I know why. Nobody even tried until he was twelve and then they kept trying to diagnose him as pre-psychotic and my mom was like “no” and then they just put him in special needs for a year because THAT’S PROBABLY WHAT HE NEEDS even though he’d already been diagnosed with Asperger’s.

(via aliceinpunderland)

Lemme take another moment to reiterate that racism =/= hurt feelings.

-Holly

(via whitepeoplesaidwhat)

Medical racism is as real as the negative physical harm misdiagnosis due to racist profiling cause black folks.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

74 notes

Supreme Court recognizes transgenders as 'third gender'

fuckyeahsouthasia:

In a landmark judgment, the Supreme Court on Tuesday created the “third gender” status for hijras or transgenders. Earlier, they were forced to write male or female against their gender.

The SC asked the Centre to treat transgender as socially and economically backward.

The apex court said that transgenders will be allowed admission in educational institutions and given employment on the basis that they belonged to the third gender category.

The SC said absence of law recognizing hijras as third gender could not be continued as a ground to discriminate them in availing equal opportunities in education and employment.

This is for the first time that the third gender has got a formal recognition. The third gender people will be considered as OBCs, the SC said.

The SC said they will be given educational and employment reservation as OBCs.

The apex court also said states and the Centre will devise social welfare schemes for third gender community and run a public awareness campaign to erase social stigma.

The SC said the states must construct special public toilets and departments to look into their special medical issues.

The SC also added that if a person surgically changes his/her sex, then he or she is entitled to her changed sex and can not be discriminated.

The apex court expressed concern over transgenders being harasssed and discriminated in the society and passed a slew of directions for their social welfare. 

The apex court said that trangenders were respected earlier in the society but situation has changed and they now face discrimination and harassment. 

It said that section 377 of IPC is being misused by police and other authorities against them and their social and economic condition is far from satisfactory. 

The bench clarified that its verdict pertains only to eunuchs and not other sections of society like gay, lesbian and bisexuals who are also considered under the umbrella term ‘transgender’. 

The bench said they are part and parcel of the society and the government must take steps to bring them in the main stream of society. 

The apex court passed the order on a PIL filed by National Legal Services Authority (NALSA) urging the court to give separate identity to transgenders by recognising them as third category of gender. 

Welcoming the Supreme Court decision, Lakshmi Narayan Tripathi, transgender rights activist said, “the progress of the country is dependent upon human rights of the people and we are very happy with the judgment as the Supreme court has given us those rights.” 

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

Filed under congratulations India

11,750 notes

shit-gets-real-when:

cooltallguy1202:

eyesofresolute128:

guildhall:

Sweet Lad, Tender Lad

A Pictorial History of Afro-American Gay Couples

Sweet lad, tender lad,
Have no shame, you’re mine for good;
We share a sole insurgent fire,
We live in boundless brotherhood.

I do not fear the gibes of men;
One being split in two we dwell,
The kernel of a double nut
Embedded in a single shell.

(From ‘Imitation of the Arabic’ by Afro-Russian poet, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin)

Playwright & historian, Trent Kelley, has curated these photographs from his personal collection documenting love and affection among African American gay male couples.  The essay is entitled ‘Hidden in the Open:  A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”

Kelley has written in the Huffington Post:

Afro American same-sex loving gay men who were coupled with one another in the distant past walked the streets, ate at the dinner tables, and generally participated in their larger ethnic community out in the open, their relationships known only to those who were consequential to their everyday lives. In this respect, they were out in the open but hidden to those who didn’t know about their sexual proclivities. Hence, the title of this series of pictures dating from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century is “Hidden in the Open: A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”

Some of these images are sure to depict gay couples, whereas others may not.

The end result is speculative at best, for want in applying a label. Not every gesture articulated between these men is an indication of male-to-male intimacies. Assuredly, what all the photographs have in common are signs of Afro-American male affection and love that were recorded for posterity without fear and shame. Friendships where men often wrote romantically to one another, walked arm in arm were not uncommon to straight and gay men alike during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Depending on economic situation, many even slept together and this may have precluded or included physical intimacy between the sheets.

But there were past generations of Afro American gay men who lived and love bravely. They exist in these photographs. Like today’s gay male of African descent, the majority of them were never victims who whined nor required rescuing. Their presence here defy a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community often wanting to make them an impotent footnote absent of any self-empowerment within gay culture and those vocally homophobic pockets within a black community wanting to write these men out of the narrative to Afro-American history.

See the rest of this outstanding collection here.

 

This is so cool!

i like this !!!!

Amor

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

272 notes

General Tso’s Chicken has become a staple of American dining; a dish that, were it not for pizza, could be crowned the most popular ethnic food item in the country. And it’s a total cash cow. The dish is carried in most of the 50,000 Chinese restaurants in the United States, produced very cheaply, and sold for about $10 a pop, resulting in billions of dollars in tasty revenue.

‘The Search for General Tso’: The Origins of America’s Favorite Chinese Dish, General Tso’s Chicken, The Daily Beast

Some notable history in this fascinating article: Apparently the Chinese food industry was first borne of the Chinese Exclusion Act, an infamous 19th century anti-immigration law which forced many Chinese immigrants out of the labor force. Self-employment became a necessity, and immigrants moved away from the West Coast partly to avoid persecution.

(via shortformblog)

(via frantzfandom)