General Briefing

Consider Yourself Briefed

3,455 notes

mehreenkasana:


The descendants of the last Maharaja of the Sikh Empire, who was forced to hand over the Koh-i-Noor diamond to Queen Victoria, will on Monday launch a court action for his body and possessions to be returned to India
[…]
The jewel is currently mounted in the crown of the Queen Consort, last worn by the late Queen Mother.

The family is also seeking the return of Maharaja Ranjit Singh’s golden throne and for both to be kept at the Golden Temple, the centre of the Sikh faith, in Amrtisar, India.


Their case reopens a controversial chapter in British colonial history that still arouses strong passions in India, particularly in Punjab, where Sikhs regard the exile of Duleep Singh and his “gift” of the Koh-i-Noor diamond to Queen Victoria in 1850 as a national humiliation.
[continued]



"Our property was confiscated by British rule. This letter establishes us as the rightful heirs of Duleep Singh and we want to get back his remains and his other belongings to the Golden Temple," Jaswinder Singh Sandhanwalia told The Daily Telegraph on Sunday.
More power to the Singh family for taking back what belongs to them. Kicking imperialism and colonialism’s collective rear end with Indian might and right.

mehreenkasana:

The descendants of the last Maharaja of the Sikh Empire, who was forced to hand over the Koh-i-Noor diamond to Queen Victoria, will on Monday launch a court action for his body and possessions to be returned to India

[…]

The jewel is currently mounted in the crown of the Queen Consort, last worn by the late Queen Mother.

The family is also seeking the return of Maharaja Ranjit Singh’s golden throne and for both to be kept at the Golden Temple, the centre of the Sikh faith, in Amrtisar, India.

Their case reopens a controversial chapter in British colonial history that still arouses strong passions in India, particularly in Punjab, where Sikhs regard the exile of Duleep Singh and his “gift” of the Koh-i-Noor diamond to Queen Victoria in 1850 as a national humiliation.

[continued]

"Our property was confiscated by British rule. This letter establishes us as the rightful heirs of Duleep Singh and we want to get back his remains and his other belongings to the Golden Temple," Jaswinder Singh Sandhanwalia told The Daily Telegraph on Sunday.

More power to the Singh family for taking back what belongs to them. Kicking imperialism and colonialism’s collective rear end with Indian might and right.

(via note-a-bear)

967 notes

globalpoetics:

White American Brutally Assaults Korean Man in a Hate Crime


Shoreline, Washington, USA —
A Korean man, Jae Kang Lee, was beaten and dragged into busy Ballinger Way in Shoreline on October 26. Police said the only motivation for the attack appeared to be the victim’s race.
They arrested Dion Packard of Arlington and charged him with malicious harassment and assault. Eyewitnesses said the beating was unprovoked. Michael Alford was pumping gas when he noticed the attack at a bus stop just 30 feet away.
He said Packard slammed Lee’s head into the bus stop pole and then the man collapsed and Packard started kicking him. The eyewitness said, “It became very scary, very quickly. He said Packard grabbed his victim around the neck and pulled him into Ballinger Way.
Alford said, "It looked to me like he was going to actually throw him into the oncoming traffic." Alford ran out onto the street, waved his arms and said “stop, stop.” Two other bystanders joined him to stop the beating and that’s when the attacker started to protest. According to Alford, he said, "Why are you helping him? Don’t you know this man’s Japanese? Don’t you know what we did for them in Vietnam?"

via http://www.kirotv.com/news/news/man-attacked-bus-stop-because-race/nbgwc/

globalpoetics:

White American Brutally Assaults Korean Man in a Hate Crime

Shoreline, Washington, USA —

A Korean man, Jae Kang Lee, was beaten and dragged into busy Ballinger Way in Shoreline on October 26. Police said the only motivation for the attack appeared to be the victim’s race.

They arrested Dion Packard of Arlington and charged him with malicious harassment and assault. Eyewitnesses said the beating was unprovoked. Michael Alford was pumping gas when he noticed the attack at a bus stop just 30 feet away.

He said Packard slammed Lee’s head into the bus stop pole and then the man collapsed and Packard started kicking him. The eyewitness said, “It became very scary, very quickly. He said Packard grabbed his victim around the neck and pulled him into Ballinger Way.

Alford said, "It looked to me like he was going to actually throw him into the oncoming traffic." Alford ran out onto the street, waved his arms and said “stop, stop.” Two other bystanders joined him to stop the beating and that’s when the attacker started to protest. According to Alford, he said, "Why are you helping him? Don’t you know this man’s Japanese? Don’t you know what we did for them in Vietnam?"

via http://www.kirotv.com/news/news/man-attacked-bus-stop-because-race/nbgwc/

(via gallifreyglo)

180 notes

nprfreshair:

As the great, great grandson of Texas slaveholders, Chris Tomlinson wanted to find out what crimes his ancestors had committed to maintain their power and privilege.   In his new book Tomlinson Hill, he writes about the slave-owning part of his family tree.  He also writes about slaves who kept the Tomlinson name after they were freed, and traces their lineage.  
Chris Tomlinson says that he intended the book to examine America’s history of race and bigotry through the paternal lines of these two families.  Tomlinson is a journalist who spent 11 years with the associated press, reporting on wars and conflicts, mostly in Africa, including the end of apartheid and the aftermath of the Rwandan genocide.  All the conflicts he covered included an element of bigotry:    

"It was inspiring to me to be in South Africa after the election [of Nelson Mandela] and to see that reckoning. Bishop Desmond Tutu established the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and at the time his argument was that before there can be reconciliation, you have to have a sharing of the truth and it has to be a common truth. One community can’t have one idea of what happened and the other community … a different idea. If you want them to reconcile, they have to agree about what happened. And that requires — for lack of a better word — confession and contrition.
…I don’t think that’s something that’s happened in the United States. And it certainly didn’t happen in my life. And so writing this book was my opportunity to go through that process — if, for no one else, [than] for the African-American Tomlinsons and my side of the family, that we have that truth and reconciliation.”

Photo of Tomlinson Hill plantation sign, via Chris Tomlinson/ Lisa Kaselak, Fosforo Films 

nprfreshair:

As the great, great grandson of Texas slaveholders, Chris Tomlinson wanted to find out what crimes his ancestors had committed to maintain their power and privilege.   In his new book Tomlinson Hill, he writes about the slave-owning part of his family tree.  He also writes about slaves who kept the Tomlinson name after they were freed, and traces their lineage.  

Chris Tomlinson says that he intended the book to examine America’s history of race and bigotry through the paternal lines of these two families.  Tomlinson is a journalist who spent 11 years with the associated press, reporting on wars and conflicts, mostly in Africa, including the end of apartheid and the aftermath of the Rwandan genocide.  All the conflicts he covered included an element of bigotry:    

"It was inspiring to me to be in South Africa after the election [of Nelson Mandela] and to see that reckoning. Bishop Desmond Tutu established the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and at the time his argument was that before there can be reconciliation, you have to have a sharing of the truth and it has to be a common truth. One community can’t have one idea of what happened and the other community … a different idea. If you want them to reconcile, they have to agree about what happened. And that requires — for lack of a better word — confession and contrition.

…I don’t think that’s something that’s happened in the United States. And it certainly didn’t happen in my life. And so writing this book was my opportunity to go through that process — if, for no one else, [than] for the African-American Tomlinsons and my side of the family, that we have that truth and reconciliation.”

Photo of Tomlinson Hill plantation sign, via Chris Tomlinson/ Lisa Kaselak, Fosforo Films 

(via dynastylnoire)

1,585 notes

exsouthernbelle:

fotojournalismus:

Day 5: Israel strikes Gaza mosque & center for the disabledGaza death toll passes 135 | July 12, 2014

1. A Palestinian boy inspects the destruction in his neighbourhood following an Israeli military strike in Gaza City. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)

2. Palestinian men inspect the rubble of a destroyed mosque following an Israeli military strike in the Nusseirat refugee camp in the central Gaza Strip. (Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images)

3. A Palestinian man and his sons stand at their damaged living room as they look outside at a neighbouring building which was targeted in an Israeli military strike in Gaza City. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)

4. A Palestinian boy carries a damaged wheelchair as he walks amidst the debris of a rehabilitation centre, which police said was struck by an Israeli tank shell, in the northern Gaza Strip. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

5. Palestinians mourn their relative in the morgue of the Shifa hospital in Gaza City. (Khalil Hamra/AP)

6. A Palestinian boy amid the remains of a rehabilitation center for the handicapped in Beit Lahiya. (Wissam Nassar for The New York Times)

7. The body of Suha Abu Saada, 28, lies in a mosque after the Palestinian centre for people with special needs housing in Beit Lahia was targeted by an Israeli air strike. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)

8. A Palestinian boy sits on the rubble of Al-Farouk mosque which was destroyed in an Israeli airstrike in Nuseirat. (Ezz Zanoon/APA)

9. Smoke rises after a cargo crossing between Israel and Gaza was shelled. (Hatem Moussa/AP)

10. Palestinian children look at the rubble of a destroyed mosque following an Israeli military strike in the Nusseirat refugee camp. (Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images)

(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4 | Naming the dead)

know this.

(via so-treu)

3 notes

Oh look! A rejection letter that claims I don’t possess the experience that is clearly documented in my resume. I don’t feel like contacting you people and asking if you can read. I’m clearly better off just letting this go. Of course, if I did challenge this shit more often maybe I wouldn’t be unemployed. :/

270 notes

Nearly half of Americans willing to concede that poverty may not result from character flaws

Hey look, according to a new poll 47 percent of us aren’t monsters.
In 1995, in the midst of a raging political debate about welfare and poverty, less than a third of poll respondents said people were in poverty because of issues beyond their control. At that time, a majority said that poverty was caused by “people not doing enough.” Now, nearly half of respondents, 47 percent, attribute poverty to factors other than individual initiative.

“In hard economic times, people become more sympathetic to the poor,” says Martin Gilens, Ph.D., a political scientist at Princeton University.

Go figure. It turns out about half us recognize that there are things that can make you poor—from simple lack of opportunity to medical crises to local economic conditions to a not-very-long string of bad luck—that do not stem from a simple case of insufficient bootstrap-pulling.

We could probably boost that number if certain news organizations let folks know that actual poor people still existed, but it’s a start.

(Source: invisiblelad, via note-a-bear)